Headrests

  • Toposa Headrest Sudan (LHRT 034)

    $245.0
    (0s)
    #LHRT 034
    instock

    These  were used as pillows to help someone to have good sleep. They also used as a comfort to help protect ceremonial coiffure. In some occasions headrests are used as stool. As a personal object, the headrest has become part of the individual. Usually, when the person died, he is buried with his headrest. Sometimes the headrest is passed on to his heir, who would treat it with respect because this wooden piece embodies the spirit of the deceased person. Material:Wood and metallic studs Age:Approximately 50-60 yrs Origin:Sudan Condition:Good  

  • Toposa Headrest Sudan (LHRT 039)

    (0s)
    #LHRT 039
    instock

    Toposa headrest originates from Southern Sudan and was used by the Toposa, Didinga and Larim in Sudan and also across a wide area of northern Uganda, Kenya and in adjacent areas of Ethiopia to protect elaborate hairstyles. Material:Wood and metallic studs Age:Approximately 50-60 yrs Origin:Southern Sudan Condition:Very good

  • Turkana Headrest (CHRT 013)

    $500.0
    (0s)
    #CHRT 013
    instock

    This is an A-shaped headrest from the Turkana, an ethnic group of agro-pastoral herders living mainly in northern Kenya. Headrests appear like simple pieces of craftmanship but they are of aesthetic value. They possess significance value and they have artistic status, they mean more than just mere objects. These pillow-like objects are some of the most distinctive East African articrafts. Headrests symbolized high social status or magical power such as the gift of foretelling. Headrests are also traditionally believed to protect elaborated headdresses, headrests are no longer a feature of modern life in this region. This fine headrest is a result of hard work and skill with its superb vertical A-shape. It is also known as a tied headrest because it is gradually tightened with a piece of leather to prevent the legs from splitting until the desired shape is obtained.  It was carved in a single piece of wood, decorated with iron spots on the sides and could only be owned by an elder aged over 50 years. Such pieces were also paid as dowry by a groom to his bride's family as a demonstration of respect. This piece could also be inherited by only a man, possibly a brother or elder son of the deceased.  Its design is similar to those of Pokot and Karamajong as a result of intermingling. It has brown wonderful patina, clear signs of usage and old age. Material: Hardwood, leather Condition: Good Age:approx 50-60yrs Origin: Kenya

  • Turkana Headrest (CHRT 014)

    $175.0
    (0s)
    #CHRT 014
    instock

    This is a rare beautiful headrest from the Turkana tribe. Turkana are located in northwestern Kenya, they are a pastoralist group living in a hostile society. This headrest is rarely symmetrical because it allows herders to avoid falling into a deep sleep due to its instability. The herders hang it on the left or right side of their belt. Due to the nomadic lifestyle of the Turkana pastoralist, they developed a custom of wearing elaborate coiffures. Carving of light, portable headrests became a necessity. For women, the headrest can also support their neck but mostly keep their hair developed. It has three legs facing different directions. The patina and wear demonstrate its importance to the owner. The vital role of headrests or stools is obvious among the Turkana.  That’s why these objects are carefully carved and carried everywhere individuals go. The following headrest has a dark brown wonderful patina, with deeply incised scarifications and shows good signs of age and usage. Material: Wood Age: approximately 55-75 yrs Origin: Kenya Condition: Good

  • Turkana Headrest (LHRT 053)

    $150.0
    (0s)
    #LHRT 053
    outofstock

    This is a rare headrest from the Turkana tribe. Turkana are located in northwestern Kenya, they are a pastoralist group living in a hostile society. This headrest is rarely symmetrical because it allows herders to avoid falling into a deep sleep due to its instability. The herders hang it on the left or right side of their belt. Due to the nomadic lifestyle of the Turkana pastoralist, they developed a custom of wearing elaborate coiffures. Carving of light, portable headrests became a necessity. For women, the headrest can also support their neck but mostly keep their hair developed. It has three legs facing different directions. The following headrest has a dark brown wonderful patina and shows good signs of age and usage. Material: Wood Age: approximately 50-60 yrs Origin: Kenya Condition: Very good

  • Turkana Headrest (LHRT 074)

    $180.0
    (0s)
    #LHRT 074
    instock

    This headrest is a message of love. A young Turkana man would offer an object like this to a woman as a way of proposing. The Turkana are located in northern Kenya, they are a pastoralist group living in a hostile society. During the courtship period, the young man would carve the headrest from softwood. Then keep it for at least three months while looking for a girl.  Once he has found her, he would send male elders from his clan to the girl's father with the headrest as a token of his proposal. The girl will be called by her mother and the headrest will be presented to her in the presence of elders from both families. The shape of this headrest has no special meaning other than as a material signifier of a marriage proposal. The curve in the center of the column is designed for easy handling. The headrest has a texture peculiar to the Turkana, it has a brownish patina and signs of old age and usage. Material: Softwood Condition: Good Age:approx 50-60yrs Origin: Kenya

  • Turkana Kenya Headrest (LHRT 040)

    $245.0
    (0s)
    #LHRT 040
    instock

    The nomadic lifestyle of the pastoralist Turkana peoples of northwestern Kenya and their custom of wearing elaborate coiffures made the use of light, portable headrests a necessity.The following headrest has a dark brown pattina and shows good signs of age and usage. Material:Wood Age:approximately 50-60 yrs Origin:Kenya Condition:Very good

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Gallery Antique Uganda